Early to mid-life obesity linked to heightened risk of dementia in later life

August 21, 2014
Science Daily/BMJ-British Medical Journal
Obesity is linked to a heightened risk of dementia in later life, reveals an observational study. But the age at which a person is obese seems to be a key factor, the findings show, with an apparent tripling in risk for people in their 30s. Estimates suggest that almost 66 million people around the globe will have dementia by 2030, with the numbers predicted to top 115 million by 2050.

Estimates suggest that almost 66 million people around the globe will have dementia by 2030, with the numbers predicted to top 115 million by 2050. There is growing evidence that obesity is linked to dementia, but the research indicates that risk may be heightened or lowered, depending on age. And as yet, no study has looked at the age related effect of obesity on dementia risk across the whole age range in the population of one country.

Later analyses demonstrated that higher total testosterone level strongly correlated with more shallow sleep. This association, Van Cauter said, was independent from the presence of other factors known to decrease sleep quality, such as age, race/ethnicity and OSA severity.

Because doctors are increasingly prescribing testosterone replacement therapy for middle-aged and older men with low testosterone levels, Van Cauter said, "Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of testosterone replacement on sleep quality, especially sleep depth."
Science Daily/SOURCE :http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140821090649.htm

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